ARTICLE

なぜ日本人はお風呂が好きなのですか?

外国人留学生から見たニッポン

  • 文学部
  • 在学生
  • 受験生
  • 卒業生
  • 企業・一般
  • 国際
  • 文化
  • このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

國學院大學文学部教授 小川直之

2015年8月3日更新

Q.日本には、いたる箇所にお風呂や温泉があり、多くの人がそれらを訪れており、入浴を好んでいる印象を受けています。お風呂にはどのような歴史があるのか、どうして日本人はお風呂が好きなのか教えてください。

There are ofuro or furo (baths) and onsen (hot springs) all over Japan with many people using them.
I want to know the history of ofuro and why Japanese are so fond of it.

A.日本人の風呂好きの理由─多様な入浴法
Japanese people love bathing in various ways

日本にはさまざまな入浴法が伝わっている。「風呂」というのは、本来、サウナのような熱気浴や蒸気浴のことで、岩窟を指すムロの中で火を焚いて熱気を充満させ、汗を流す入浴である。現在も瀬戸内沿岸から九州北部に「石風呂」などと呼んで存在する。蒸気を充満させた温室の中に入る蒸気浴は近畿地方にあった。

温湯の中に身をひたす温浴は、これを行う場所を「湯殿」、有料の共同浴場を「湯屋」などということからわかるように、「湯」と呼ばれていた。「湯」には温泉の意味もあり、7世紀には「有馬の湯」、「伊予の湯」(道後温泉)などが知られていたし、温泉神社とか湯神社が平安時代後期の文献に見える。以上のような風呂や湯は共同のもので、現在のように家に入浴施設を設けるようになったのは江戸時代以降である。

蒸し暑い夏と寒冷な冬への対応と、火山国で温泉に恵まれていることで、日本に多様な入浴法がうまれたことが、日本人を入浴好きにしたといえる。

img_01

Japanese society practices a variety of centuries-old bathing patterns. Furo (風呂)originally meant nekki-yoku (熱気浴: hot-air bathing) and joki-yoku (蒸気浴: steam or vapor bathing), just like sauna bathing. Those traditional bathing methods required muro (ムロ: cavern) where people made a fire to fill the space with hot air, letting people sweat. Even today, such bathing facilities, called ishi-buro (石風呂: stone baths), exist in western Japan ― from the Seto Inland Sea coastal areas to northern Kyushu. In the Kinki region, people used to enjoy joki-yoku in hothouses full of steam.

Yu (湯: hot water) is the key word for knowing more about furo and onsen (温泉). The word yu is used to refer to on’yu (温湯: hot or warm water) in which people immerse their bodies in a warm bath ; the facility housing such a bath is called yudono (湯殿: bathroom or bathhouse); and a common hot-water bathhouse shared by people for a fee is known as yuya (湯屋). In Japan, yu is also used to refer to hot springs like “Arima no yu (有馬の湯)” in Arima, Kobe, and “Iyo no yu (伊予の湯)” now known as Dogo onsen hot spa resort in Matsuyama, both of which date back to the seventh century. Literature from the latter half of the Heian period (794-1185) has references to onsen and yu shrines. Furo and onsen facilities were shared by people until the Edo period (1603-1867) when individual households began having private baths, as we do today.

Japan’s climate ― hot and humid in summer and cold in winter ― and the abundance of hot springs across the volcanic archipelago are the secrets behind the existence of various bathing patterns across the country and Japan’s love affair with hot-water bathing.

logo
2015年8月3日付け、The Japan News掲載広告から

MENU