ARTICLE

なぜ日本には玄関があり、敷居があるのですか?

外国人留学生から見たニッポン

  • 文学部
  • 在学生
  • 受験生
  • 卒業生
  • 企業・一般
  • 国際
  • 文化
  • このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

國學院大學文学部教授 新谷尚紀

2015年9月24日更新

Q.日本に来て、玄関には段差が設けられており、そこで靴を脱ぐ習慣があることに驚きましたが、このことにはどのような意味があるのですか?

When I started living in Japan, I was surprised to see the slight difference in the floor levels at the genkan (small entryway) of a typical Japanese house and people taking off their shoes there.
What are the reasons for the structural difference and removing one’s shoes?

A.「玄関は「内」と「外」をわける境界
Genkan, the boundary that divides inside and outside

まず大きな理由として、日本の置かれる地理的要因が挙げられます。日本は、高温多湿な島国であるため、家屋は高床式の湿気が抜けやすい構造に設えられています。そのため、玄関にも段差が設けられ、そこで靴を脱ぐという習慣が日本では定着しています。

次に「外」「内」を明確に分ける観念があるためです。歴史的に遡ると、貴族の屋敷や武士の武家屋敷には玄関がありましたが、庶民の住む長屋には玄関はありませんでした。玄関にあたる入り口から中に入ると、隣には土間が設けられ、そこで藁仕事などが行われていました。外と内の区切りである敷居をまたぎ、そこで履物を脱ぎ、板の間から畳の部屋に入りました。こうした形式が、日本の伝統的な住居の形式として根付いています。

ちなみに日本では、玄関は家の顔ともされ、絵や花、人形や写真などを飾る家庭が多くあります。一方の欧米では、大切な家族の写真などは暖炉の上に飾られています。

img_01

The answer to your question is largely related to Japan’s climate. To cope with high temperatures and high humidity, especially in summer, a typical Japanese house has a raised floor to allow air circulation. This results in the entryway or genkan (玄関) being at a different level from the interior of the house. Hence, Japanese people customarily take off their shoes at the entryway.

The traditional design of Japanese houses also took into account people’s tendency to clearly divide inside and outside. In the past, the homes of aristocrats and samurai (warriors) had genkan entryways, while nagaya (長屋) or single-story wooden row-houses ― narrow living quarters for common people ― did not. Nagaya dwellings usually had earthen floors between the doors and the living sections where residents made things out of straw ― like straw sandals. They then crossed the threshold and took off their footwear before walking through a small wood-floor area into the tatami rooms. This old-time architectural concept can still be seen in modern Japanese houses.

Japanese people regard the genkan as the face of each house and therefore many families display paintings, flowers, dolls or landscape photographs there. This is similar to how people in the West decorate fireplace mantels with family photographs and other things.

logo
2015年9月24日付け、The Japan News掲載広告から

MENU