ARTICLE

「ちょんまげ」はなぜあのような形をしているのですか?

外国人留学生から見たニッポン

  • 文学部
  • 在学生
  • 受験生
  • 卒業生
  • 企業・一般
  • 国際
  • 文化
  • このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

國學院大學文学部教授 根岸茂夫

2015年10月5日更新

Q.侍の「ちょんまげ」の髪型を見たときに、とても驚きました。なぜあのような形をしているのですか?

I was really surprised when I first saw a picture showing samurai warriors wearing “chonmage” topknots. Why did they adopt such a unique hairstyle?

A.古くは髪をまとめて冠の中に入れるために結ったものです。
The “chonmage” hairstyle originated from using ancient headgear

男子は古代から頭に冠や烏帽子を着用するのが一般的であり、その中に髪を纏めて入れたため、髪を纏めたのが髷の原型です。古代には冠などの中に入れるため、上に立てていました。ただ中世に入り武士の世の中になると、武士たちは、合戦に際して兜をかぶるために髷を解きました。また合戦のとき、頭に血が上るといって、頭部の髪を抜きました。これが月代(さかやき)で、頭部の前面から頭頂の髪を除いたものです。月代は剃るのでなく抜いたために、戦国時代に来日した宣教師ルイス・フロイスは、合戦には武士が頭を血だらけにしていると記しています。中世後期には一般に烏帽子などをかぶらなくなり、髷を後ろに纏めて垂らし、烏帽子や冠は公家・武士・神職などが儀式に着用する程度になりました。近世には、月代が庶民にまで広がって剃るのが一般化し、髷を前にまげて頭の上に置くようになると、丁髷(ちょんまげ)と呼ばれました。丁髷は明治4年(1871)断髪令が出たのち廃れ、現在では力士などが結うだけです。

img_01

In ancient times, it was a common practice among men in Japan to wear “kanmuri” or“eboshi” headgear as a status symbol. They tied and tucked their hair into a ponytail – the origin of the “mage” (topknot) – then put it on their heads before slipping on the headgear.

However, warriors going to battle in the medieval age untied their topknots so that they were able to put on “kabuto” (helmets) more smoothly. In addition, they removed hair from the frontal part of the tops of their heads to keep their heads cool inside the helmet. As this practice, called “sakayaki,” required actually hair instead of shaving, Portuguese missionary Luis Frois wrote in his memoir about his tour of Japan in the 16th century that the heads of Japanese warriors in battlefields were smeared with blood.

In the latter half of the medieval age, “kanmuri”and “eboshi” were no longer used except during rituals and ceremonies by court nobles, warriors and priests.

In early modern society, common people followed a modified version of “sakayaki” – shaving the frontal part of the top of the head while folding the bun of hair forward and putting the upper part of it on the top center of the head. They called the hairstyle “chonmage.” The practice came to an end in 1871, or the fourth year of the Meiji era, when the Meiji government, which toppled the shogunate, issued an ordinance to end the “chonmage” hairstyle. Today, “chonmage” are worn almost exclusively by sumo wrestlers.

logo
2015年10月5日付け、The Japan News掲載広告から

MENU