ARTICLE

擬音語・擬態語をどのように学べばよいでしょうか?

外国人留学生から見たニッポン

  • 文学部
  • 在学生
  • 受験生
  • 卒業生
  • 企業・一般
  • 国際
  • 文化
  • このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

國學院大學文学部教授 吉田永弘

2015年9月7日更新

Q.日本語には擬音語・擬態語がたくさんある上に、「ごろり」「ごろごろ」など似たような表現があって日本語を学習する時に特に難しく感じます。擬音語・擬態語をどのように学べばよいでしょうか?

Japanese has a large variety of onomatopoeic and mimetic words. Moreover, the language has so many mimetic words that are expressed similarly ― like “gorori” and “gorogoro” ― that Japanese learners find it particularly difficult to master them.
How should we learn onomatopoeic and mimetic words?

A.擬音語・擬態語は体系的な語彙
Onomatopoeic and mimetic words are systematically structured

「★」を日本語でホシと呼び、英語でstarと呼ぶように、ある意味を表す場合にどのような音で表すかは言語によって異なる。意味と音の結びつきに必然性がないからである。

ところが、日本語には、動物の鳴き声などの現実の音を写す擬音語と出来事の様子を写す擬態語が豊富にあり、日本人はそれらを意味と音の結びつきに必然性があるように捉えている。例えば、石が転がる様子をコロコロ、岩が転がる様子をゴロゴロで表すが、無声子音[k]は軽い様子、有声子音[g]は重い様子を表し、ともに「1-2-1-2」の形で運動が続いている様子を表す。また、「1-2-t」のコロッ、ゴロッは素早く一回転する様子、「1-2-n」のコロン、ゴロンは弾むように一回転する様子を表す。

このように、音と意味に対応が見られるので、日本語の擬音語・擬態語は、体系的に学習する必要がある。擬音語・擬態語に相当する語が母語にないために難しく感じる場合もあるが、体系的な理解が求められる点が、難しく感じる大きな要因となっているのだろう。

img_01-3

The symbol [★] is called “hoshi” (星) in Japanese and “star” in English. In general, the way each word is pronounced to represent its particular meaning varies from language to language. This is because there is not always a specific link between the meaning and the sound of each word, as far as most languages are concerned.

However, Japanese is one exception as it is abundant in both onomatopoeic words that imitate the actual sounds made by, or related to, their respective referents, including animals, and mimetic words that depict the features of phenomena. Japanese people think there is relevance between the meanings and sounds of those words. For example, Japanese use the mimetic words “korokoro” (コロコロ) and “gorogoro” (ゴロゴロ) to express the sounds of a rolling stone and a rolling rock, respectively. In this case, the unvoiced consonant [k] is used to refer to the stone’s lightness while the voiced consonant [g] represents the rock’s heaviness. Both onomatopoeic words have a [1-2-1-2] sound pitch, indicating the ongoing movement of each object. Similarly, there are a [1-2-t] modulating pattern of either “korot” (コロッ) or “gorot” (ゴロッ) to cite a single quick roll and a [1-2-n] pitch of either “koron” (コロン) or “goron” (ゴロン) to refer to a bouncing roll.

Given the symmetrical presentation of the sound and meaning of each onomatopoeic or mimetic word, Japanese learners are advised to acquire such words systematically as a way of building up their vocabulary. I am sympathetic with those Japanese learners who find it particularly difficult to grasp them because their mother tongues have no equivalent. Don’t give up!

logo
2015年9月7日付け、The Japan News掲載広告から

MENU